This Old Server, Part 3: Lighting it up!

Dell server case being tested

I’m writing about an old Dell 1800 server case that I have modified for a whitebox server.  Last time I talked about the old front panel, this is how I had to build a new one.

This is the Supermicro’s front panel connection pinout, similar to other white-box servers.  I did not use the NIC1, NIC2 or Power Fail LED connections

1 Power switch
2 Power switch GND
3 Reset switch
4 Reset switch GND
5 Vcc +5V
6 Power fail LED (not used)
7 Vcc +5V
8 Overheat/Fan fail LED
9 Vcc +5V
10 LAN NIC2 active (not used)
11 Vcc +5V
12 LAN NIC1 active (not used)
13 Vcc +5V
14 HDD LED
15 Vcc +5V
16 Power LED
17 Key (No connection)
18 Key (No connection)
19 NMI switch
20 GND

This is my completed board:

Old Dell Server Case 2013-10-01 002

I did a cheap and ugly thing for the connecting cable:  I used an old hard drive cable and cut off half the pins with a hacksaw, then used hot-melt glue to seal one end of the connector so it could plug into the motherboard without coming apart.

The original board had buttons for power, ID (identification) and NMI.  The ID feature is common to server boards and consists of a blinking light that is activated with a pushbutton, or remotely from SNMP systems management software.  My Supermicro does have a remote management board, but I could not find the equivalent function, so the ID button on the original board is now a reset button.

The NMI button is recessed on the Dell and it is common on servers, including white-box boards.  When pushed, the system asserts the NMI—Non-Maskable Interrupt—signal which will halt most systems.  Windows will bluescreen (with the appropriate registry changes), and provide a crash dump on this signal.  The Supermicro has an NMI input so this is perfect.

I put just three LED’s on the board:  Power, which is no longer blue (I broke the original LED when trying to salvage it) but now white, HD access (orange) and Overheat/Fan Fail (orange).

I preserved the original intrusion switch and connector, which runs to another connector on the Supermicro board.  I haven’t been able to find intrusion settings in the BIOS but I presume they are there, unless they are in the IPMI remote interface.

At this point, I had a functional system in my new case.  Next post is the finish, with a few loose ends and final thoughts.

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One Comment on “This Old Server, Part 3: Lighting it up!”

  1. […] This Old Server, Part 3: Lighting it up! → […]


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